Mobile homes have always had a stigma of being a second-rate home. They’re cramped and cheaply made, nowhere near the quality of traditional housing. But lately there has been a shift that many are unaware of.  With over 20 million Americans living in manufactured housing we have to ask the question: Are mobile homes becoming the housing of choice for many in the middle class?

We’re long past the days of calling mobile homes “Trailers”.  Today’s mobile homes are, in a lot of ways, built better than your conventional stick built homes.  With 2×6 walls, mobile homes have more insolation than the walls found in most suburban neighborhoods.  But that’s not the only thing separating these mobile monsters from conventional housing these days.




In todays manufactured housing market, homes are being built for a higher taste.  Although still thought to be very affordable, these houses are now replicating higher end homes found in some of the nicest subdivisions in America. With large kitchens, enormous living rooms, and sometimes up to five bedrooms, mobile homes are becoming the home of choice for many growing families with a modest budget.




The homes being built today sport nice built-in shelving for entertainment centers, large kitchen islands for entertaining guests, and many now come with high end upgrades, like stainless steel farm sinks and dazzling light fixtures.  The rooms are spacious, allowing plenty of room for entertaining, whether for holidays or just weekend company.

Bathrooms have not been overlooked in this new era either.  Long gone are the days of manufacturers installing large, bulky garden tubs.  In today’s homes, bathrooms are being constructed with beautiful shower “rooms”.  Fitted with rainfall shower heads, benches for relaxing, and door-less entries, these showers make for a gorgeous separation between His and Her sides of the bathroom.




In a country where mobile homes have historically been deemed the housing of last resort, it’s clear that manufacturers are attempting to break this stereotype by appealing to a new generation in need of affordable housing without sacrificing quality.

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